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20121120
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as advances in military and defense technology. from last week, this runs just over an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome. my name is gideon and i'm the editor of foreign affairs and it is a wonderful privilege and honor and pleasure to be here again at the halifax from. foreign affairs is in the business of serious discussions by knowledgeable people with important issues, free and frank exchanges on the most important questions out there and that's actually the same business that halifax is and so we are delighted to be the media sponsor, and it is going to be fantastic weekend. let me just cut right to the chase. we have a fantastic panel, and more importantly, a great topic and a wonderful group with all of you as well and so let's get right to it. our panelists here, david singer of "the new york times," the former undersecretary deputy secretary of state for global affairs now a fellow at the center at harvard. the head of telefax holders distinguished sibling, the munich security conference where they have a great group. the point of the session is to do some big thinking on
a major, new bold investment program, going into a new market, expanding a new technology, ect., you are worried about what the tax rate will be when that's generates cash in nine years. the best thing to do is create a lower rate, an expectation that there's not giant tax increases later. >> i agree with that. i think we should do in, but, a, you know we have the highest statutory right and no higher than average effective rates because we have the narrowest base of owl corporate income in the world. >> yeah. >> one of the reasons we have that system is because people like us argued for many years that the more efficient thing, the more, the better way to encourage investment was not to cut the corporate rate, but to have massively accelerated depreciation, expansion of investment, focusing on incentives rather than cutting the rate overall. i think the intuition is changing, but the way we're going it cut the rate is not by closing loopholes, but come out a painful expansions of the base like getting rid of accelerated depreciation and things which have a value so i think -- >> is
prepared for the possibility. >> just to follow of that and the technology peace, we can be hammered with the potential of drones but can we push too far with technology 15 years of untamed osama bin laden is that possible with drones and the cia how much gets inside of a massive amount to do that? stock about notes and careers jones will not find those and a critical information was collected by active computing but by hands. how possible is it to combat terrorism if it is not fixed on a map if we don't have partners or allies are human beings on the ground then what is the point*? >> you are clearly right. when they did not a decisive enough is the reconstitution of humans by networks all over the world. the cost of those is nothing compared to five nuclear submarines to the military budget. i think we can and to maintain the collection and analysis process in our about -- military without breaking the budget. and the best way to get the most out of the military force but when we faint on those lines we don't want to toss out the jt's of having an army even though we may not have a
with the fact that he is clearly of german technology and remote targeting a suspected terrorist sense to me that a lot of people's expectations ass asserted a pact leaning president were misguided. nothing illustrates that were then his decision to go after osama bin laden. now when i talk about the characters in the story, you'll forgive me because i don't thing about these things in the way that scholars to her may be that you would doing an analysis for the military. i am a storyteller. so to me if interested in the arc of care nurse. so you've got admiral mccray then who goes from a wheelchair months after 9/11, who gets an opportunity to work in the white house as a consultant, probably because somebody is looking out for him because they know he can't perform physically anymore. as a result, starts thinking strategically, plus what is learned about special operations in his study of special ops to the problem of al qaeda. it is not by coincidence that he ends up becoming second-in-command and then succeeds general mcchrystal is the commander said that when the time comes to launch thi
poorly on the president? >> i'm afraid i blame everything on technology. i don't think this is an unusual thing to happen. it's just that we have a complete electronic trail. i think for thousands of years you've had adultery and all these things. >> brian: you're talk being the actual act. i'm talking about the president knowing. >> i'm also saying i don't think the president would know. you wouldn't have the f.b.i. investigating the c.i.a. if you didn't have all this electronic trail to follow. i don't think you would have all that. >> brian: but this is something that results in some type of blackmail in. >> yes. >> brian: that's the -- >> that's the problem. you have peter king, chairman of the homeland security committee in the house suggesting that perhaps general petraeus' testimony to them was compromised, briefing was compromised. >> brian: because that testimony included? >> the cover-up line about benghazi, which is that this was somehow part of a massive mob stimulated by the -- >> brian: a democrat said this hit me like a lightning bolt. they should have been briefed. >> we k
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)